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2006 World Cup Score Board & News Central [Closed]
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Funner
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 4:48 pm    Post subject: Ha ha ha ha Reply with quote

How bout this comment from a viewer about the Italia:

Quote:
what kind of team celebrates by taking each other's pants off? What kind of team thinks it is more important to take each other's pants off than to shake hands with your opponents?
super grin super grin
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Fleur
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 8:47 pm    Post subject: FIFA's wrath was easy to take Reply with quote

X wrote:
This Zidane thing is not blown over yet. There's FIFA's wrath to come.


Apparently, FIFA's response was to name Zidane best player in the tournament:

X wrote:
Re football, did you see Zidane got Word Cup's top honor Golden Ball Award? I'm glad to see that but kind of disappointed because the world's standard for excellence has been lowered.


American (and I guess other foreign) press may be hard on him, but the French have chosen - wisely, I think - to remember what he has done for France and for the team instead of concentrating on his last big mistake. Chirac made no mention of it at all in his speech, but assured Zidane of the French people's admiration and affection. The fans did greet the returning team almost as enthusiastically as if they had won. They saw how hard they had fought. And other teams, including the Italians, have played down and dirty. A lot of other head buttings, dives, grabbing, tripping, etc. went unpunished. It doesn't excuse Zidane, but it puts things in perspective.

His team-mates were not mad at him either, but rallied around him. They said that yes, he did snap, but that proved that like everyone of us, he's only human.

Judging from his face throughout the welcome home celebrations, I think the way Zidane must feel about himself is punishment enough for him. I still think what he did was unforgiveable, but he was tired and hurt and was provoked, and, as they said, he's only human.

It was very interesting to see the difference of tone in the coverage on American TV and on French TV. I haven't seen what the BBC said yet.

Ah well. At least in tennis Amélie Mauresmo did win Wimbledon - a first! French sports is not a total loss. Not, mind you, that finishing second (and it was a close thing) in the world in soccer is anything to be ashamed about. That's still better than Brazil, Germany, Argentina and other great soccer powers.

X, you're right in one thing though: this hasn't blown over yet. And you're also right in that Zidane should keep silent over the reasons for his boiling over. "C'est fini", it's over, let everyone just move on.

I also agree with you about the exchange of sweaty jerseys and pants. Eek
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Friend of Fleur
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 9:05 pm    Post subject: Zidane Reply with quote

I support Zidane 100%.
France played much better than Italy.
Still they chose him the best player in the world cup.
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Pols
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:40 pm    Post subject: NY Times view of the matter Reply with quote

July 10, 2006
A Star Falters, France Fades, Italy Rejoices
By JERE LONGMAN

BERLIN, July 9 — What could have been a glorious coronation of the soccer career of the French captain Zinédine Zidane became a shameful departure Sunday when he was ejected from the World Cup final for committing an astonishing act of unsportsmanlike behavior.


Zidane loses composure, France loses game

Italy won its fourth World Cup title, by 5-3 in a penalty-kick shootout, after the score remained 1-1 through overtime. But the match is certain to be remembered for Zidane's head-butting the Italian defender Marco Materazzi in the chest after the two exchanged words in the 109th minute.

With that moment of recklessness during the final game of a career that made him, in the eyes of many, the greatest soccer player of the past 20 years, Zidane, 34, might have cost his team its second World Cup title in eight years. He might have also undermined his reputation for cleverness and flair and decency.

Zidane, the son of Algerian immigrants, is known for his discretion and shyness in France as well as for his soccer brilliance. His two goals in the victorious final of the 1998 World Cup against Brazil struck a blow for multiculturalism and became a rebuke of anti-immigration sentiment in France. But he has had his irresponsible moments on the field.

"Zidane being sent off was the key element of the game," said France's coach, Raymond Domenech. "Especially in extra time — the Italian team was obviously waiting for a penalty shootout." Domenech said he had not seen the play from the bench.

"But if Zidane did what they are saying, then the players regret it and I'm sure Zidane himself regrets it," he said. "The man of the match is Materazzi, because he scored and he sent off Zidane. I think this is sad, very sad, for him to end his career like this. I would have preferred to have taken him out five minutes earlier so that the crowd could have applauded him."

In the seventh minute, Zidane put France ahead, 1-0, on a penalty kick, becoming only the fourth player to score in two World Cup finals. But he apparently grew frustrated after narrowly missing a goal on a header in overtime and at being roughed up by Italy's rugged defense. He frequently complained to the referee but was told to play on.

In the 109th minute, Materazzi and Zidane seemed to tangle inconsequentially for position, with Materazzi having his arm on Zidane or grabbing him slightly. As the two walked upfield, the players spoke to each other. Then Zidane turned around, approached Materazzi and head-butted him in the sternum.

The two had been at the center of two of the game's critical plays. It was Materazzi's clipping of midfielder Florent Malouda in the penalty area that led to Zidane's penalty kick in the opening minutes. And it was Materazzi, known primarily as a defensive enforcer, who tied the score, 1-1, in the 19th minute with a header off a corner kick.

In overtime, the two became involved again, this time with Zidane suddenly angry and boiling out of control.

Zidane's head butt left Materazzi collapsed on the field. Italy protested vehemently, and a delay and some confusion followed. Marcello Lippi, the Italian coach, said that officials off the field watched a television replay before a decision was rendered. Unlike the National Football League, soccer does not use replay to adjudicate disputed plays. Observers believed this was the first time a video review had been used.

The match referee, Horacio Elizondo of Argentina, showed a red card to Zidane, ejecting him in the 110th minute. This left France to play the final 10 minutes of overtime with 10 men. Zidane's absence also meant that France had to face the shootout without its most reliable player. Not only had Zidane scored on a penalty kick earlier in Sunday's match, but he had also delivered a penalty kick in a 1-0 semifinal victory over Portugal.

This was not the first time Zidane had issues with discipline. He was suspended for France's final group match in this World Cup after receiving yellow-card warnings for fouls in each of France's first two matches. During group play of the 1998 World Cup, he received a two-game suspension for stamping on the back of a Saudi Arabian player. In 2000, he was barred for five matches after head-butting an opponent while playing for Juventus of Turin in the Champions League, Europe's most prestigious club tournament.

With Sunday's ejection, Zidane left the field, head bowed, and did not return for the postmatch medal ceremony. Perhaps anticipating the outcry against his star's behavior, Domenech later suggested that perhaps Zidane had felt provoked by the way the Italians nipped at him all game — impeding him, knocking him down, injuring his shoulder — with a resolute and unapologetic defense.

"There are moments, when you take blows for 80 minutes," Domenech said. "I'm not saying I'm excusing it, but I can understand."

Defender William Gallas also suggested that Zidane had been provoked. "France was the better team; fate decided otherwise," he said.

Italy did have its ugly moments in this World Cup. Two players, including Materazzi, were sent off during matches after drawing red cards for fouls. But Italy's defense also played with great determination and cohesiveness and impenetrability.

Seldom did anyone stray out of position. Midfielder Gennaro Gattuso was relentless in clogging Zidane and others before him in midfield. Fabio Cannavaro, Italy's captain, was unyielding in central defense. All during the tournament, Italy's defenders crowded around attackers like iron filings around a magnet.

The only two goals it allowed were a shot it kicked into its own net against the United States, and Zidane's penalty kick early in Sunday's match.

Still, Sunday's game became disjointed and was frequently interrupted by injury on both sides after a promising start. A flurry of action in the first 20 minutes was followed by long stretches in which both teams lacked energy and momentum. In that sense, the final represented the uneven play in this entire low-scoring World Cup.

But that did not stop Italy from celebrating and finally moving beyond the fear of penalty kicks, which had eliminated the Azzurri in three of the previous four World Cups, including the final in 1994.

A number of Italian commentators — and even some players — spoke of the dread of penalty kicks before this tournament. But during Sunday's shootout, Andrea Pirlo, Materazzi, Daniele De Rossi, Alessandro Del Piero and Fabio Grosso each took kicks with great assurance and accuracy.

Meanwhile, David Trezeguet, facing a Juventus teammate in goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon, knocked his penalty kick errantly into the crossbar on France's second attempt, the ball ricocheting straight down and missing the goal line by inches. (Trezeguet scored the winning goal in overtime to beat Italy in the final of the 2000 European Championships.)

When Grosso put Italy's final kick into the upper right corner, France was mathematically eliminated and a relieved Italy began to celebrate.

"We had fear of the penalties," Gattuso said. "Our history was not so great, so that was the fear."

Many thought this World Cup title would remain elusive for another reason — a match-fixing scandal that has clouded the results of the top Italian league, known as Serie A. Yet Italy seemed galvanized, not distracted, and added a fourth World Cup trophy to ones previously won in 1934, 1938 and 1982. Only Brazil, with five, has won more.

Lippi, the Italian coach, perhaps recalling the turmoil of Italy's match-fixing scandal, called Sunday's victory "the most satisfying moment of my life."

Early on, Buffon, Italy's superb goal keeper, said a World Cup victory might give those involved in Italy's billowing scandal a kind of amnesty. The scandal involves Italy's top club, Juventus, and three other clubs. Club officials could face sentencing as early as Tuesday. Sunday night, Gattuso seemed to echo Buffon's sentiment, saying, "Maybe this helps the judges know what to do."

Gattuso added: "If the scandal hadn't happened, I think we wouldn't have won the World Cup. It has given us more strength. The squad showed great heart. Maybe it wasn't pretty, but we were hard to beat."

Forward Luca Toni dedicated the victory to all Italians "from Sicily to Lombardy, who are celebrating in all the little towns; we came here with lots of problems and you can see what a great group we are."

And now it is France that is leaving with lots of problems, its captain disgraced by a staggering loss of composure.

"It's awful to see him leave that way," Domenech said of Zidane, "because I sincerely believed he would lift that trophy."
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It'sMax
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:41 pm    Post subject: Re: Zidane Reply with quote

Friend of Fleur wrote:
Still they chose him the best player in the world cup.

And that award is a slap on the Italians' faces. Twisted Evil
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ItsX
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is only discussion. I don't mean to instigate anything or bash France.

It is not FIFA who decides the Golden Ball Award. It's journalists' votes. But FIFA may as well need ZZ for better or worse because the man's name has already become far more recognizable than any player's. ZZ is actually entertaining to watch when he is not stomping, heatbutting anybody. Otherwise, this WC would be a bit mediocre and forgettable (FIFA prez's complaint about record low goals, record high cards, no diversity as it's like another European Tournament, lack of star performance, you name it).

Fleur is right about winning the 2nd place, except the whole French team didn't feel like she does. Did you see Domenech and several team members quickly putting away the silver medals as if they were their dirty undies? I don't remember they even lined up together for a photo, did they?
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Wildflower



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Location: Shuttling between France and the US

PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 11:02 pm    Post subject: Second best doesn't cut the mustard Reply with quote

ItsX wrote:
Fleur is right about winning the 2nd place, except the whole French team didn't feel like she does. Did you see Domenech and several team members quickly putting away the silver medals as if they were their dirty undies? I don't remember they even lined up together for a photo, did they?


No, of course when you expected to be first, second-best feels like dirty laundry. I didn't see them putting away the silver medals, but I can well believe it. None of the French tv shows even aired that shot.

Zidane stayed away from the medal-award ceremony, and Barthez didn't attend any of the festivities in France for "family reasons" (likely story!). But there was a photo of the whole team, with Jacques and Bernadette Chirac, on the front steps of the Elysée palace. Also on the balcony of the hotel on Place de la Concorde, where they waved at all the fans, who insisted on having Zidane come out though he was hiding in the background. His team mates had to drag him out. The only time he smiled during the whole day is when Chirac told him how much the French loved him. Don't let anybody say that French people are racists! They could have slammed him for losing the Cup for them, instead they lit up a national monument for him in his hour of disgrace just as they did in his hour of triumph in 1998. Can you imagine the Statue of Liberty lit up in honor of a minority sportsperson in the States? Especially one whose behavior lost the country a championship title?
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Wildflower



Joined: 03 Mar 2005
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Location: Shuttling between France and the US

PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 11:05 pm    Post subject: Re: Zidane Reply with quote

It'sMax wrote:
Friend of Fleur wrote:
Still they chose him the best player in the world cup.

And that award is a slap on the Italians' faces. Twisted Evil


Heheheheh! bleh

X, what do you mean about lack of star performance? The Brazilians played like a dream, and the French, after they did wake up from their 8 year slumber, played like champions. But it wasn't their "sô'" to win this time. Some demon got into Zidane, Barthez and Trézeguet. Zidane lost his cool, the other two didn't perform at their usual level. As to Thierry Henry and Ribéry, they didn't live up to their reputations either. Henry was wandering around in a daze, more often than not off-side, and Ribéry, the newcomer to the team who was supposed to be so good, was definitely "off" when he tried to score. Plus Cissé had to break his leg in a friendly match just before the WC! Rolling Eyes

As I said before, it just wasn't meant to be this time. Next time it'll be a whole new team. We can only wait and see what happens.
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 12:08 am    Post subject: Re: Zidane Reply with quote

Wildflower wrote:
It'sMax wrote:
Friend of Fleur wrote:
Still they chose him the best player in the world cup.

And that award is a slap on the Italians' faces. Twisted Evil


Heheheheh! bleh



Hehehe in a way it is. Imagine how upset Marco Materazzi must be right now. Very Happy
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ItsX
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 12:34 am    Post subject: Re: FIFA's wrath was easy to take Reply with quote

Fleur wrote:
And you're also right in that Zidane should keep silent over the reasons for his boiling over. "C'est fini", it's over, let everyone just move on.


Do you think it was a coincidence that ZZ headbutted the guy who headbutted in an equalizer to ZZ's only goal? What about ZZ kicking the Korean whose kick denied ZZ's ball-run inside the zone? hehehehe shifty hehehehhe

I won't go into the stomped Saud though... very happy
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