AVENUE VIET Forum Index AVENUE VIET
An Online Community
 
AlbumAlbum   FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
The views expressed herein are the writers' own and do not necessarily reflect those of the webmasters, administrators and moderators of this forum. Refer to the complete disclaimer.
The Oscars, 2018
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    AVENUE VIET Forum Index » Entertainment
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Viet Chick



Joined: 01 Sep 2007
Posts: 1170
Location: Where the Boys Are

PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 3:41 pm    Post subject: The Oscars, 2018 Reply with quote

Fall-out of the #MeToo Movement
Why James Franco Got Snubbed of an Oscar Nomination
Was James Franco’s Oscar Snub Due to His Sexual-Misconduct Allegations?
As other Hollywood players have been taken down by #MeToo allegations, Franco just lost a Best Actor nod.
BY Kevin Fallon

Less than two weeks ago, the Los Angeles Times published an investigation in which five women accused James Franco of “inappropriate or sexually exploitative behavior,” leading many to believe that the prolific actor would be the next powerful Hollywood player in the #MeToo movement whose career would fall in atonement for his actions.

Was Franco’s Oscar snub this morning the first punishment?

The Times investigation coincided with the prime of Franco’s campaign for what had seemed to be a sure-thing Best Actor nomination for The Disaster Artist, in which he stars as Tommy Wiseau, the notorious director and star of The Room, widely believed to be the worst film ever made. (In a meta twist, Franco also directs the film.)

In fact, Franco was delivering an acceptance speech at the Golden Globes for Best Actor in a Comedy when a series of tweets went viral that criticized the actor for wearing a Time’s Up pin to the ceremony in support of victims of sexual abuse and harassment. “Cute #TIMESUP pin James Franco. Remember the time you pushed my head down in a car towards your exposed penis & that other time you told my friend to come to your hotel when she was 17? After you had already been caught doing that to a different 17 year old?” read a tweet from one accuser.

(In response to the allegations, Franco has said: “I have my own side of this story, but I believe in, you know, these people that have been underrepresented getting their stories out enough that I will, you know, hold back things that I could say just because I believe in it that much. And if I have to take a knock because I’m not going to, you know, try and, you know, actively refute things, then I will, because I believe in it that much.”)

At a time when repercussions for men accused of misconduct have come with a sharp swinging axe, it would be logical to assume the allegations torpedoed the star’s Oscar chances.

Quote:
“In fact, voters’ affinity for Denzel Washington, whose nomination came as one of the biggest shocks Tuesday morning, may even be the biggest factor of all.”

The truth is that it’s impossible to tell how, if at all, the allegations and Franco’s response affected Oscar voters and his nomination, let alone make a judgment as to whether his exclusion in the Best Actor category could be viewed as the Academy condemning his behavior at all.

When Tiffany Haddish and Andy Serkis announced that Timothee Chalamet, Daniel Day-Lewis, Daniel Kaluuya, Gary Oldman, and Denzel Washington were the Best Actor contenders and not Franco, most pundits were shocked because the reasoning is more likely due to voters not warming up to his Disaster Artist performance—not because of any reaction to the allegations against him.

In fact, voters’ affinity for Denzel Washington, whose nomination came as one of the biggest shocks Tuesday morning, may even be the biggest factor of all.

When the Los Angeles Times story broke on January 11, voters had already been submitting their Oscar ballots for nearly a full week; voting began on January 5. When the story published, less than 48 hours remained before voting closed.

Who knows how many voters fill out their ballots early and how many wait until the last minute. But it’s highly likely that enough had submitted their choices and sealed his fate before the Times story broke.

Anecdotally, there were many voters who had already put Franco on their ballots, and regretted it.

Read more:
https://www.thedailybeast.com/was-james-francos-oscar-snub-due-to-his-sexual-misconduct-allegations?via=newsletter&source=DDMorning
_________________
Back to top
View user's profileSend private message
Fool Moon



Joined: 28 Mar 2005
Posts: 190

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 3:25 pm    Post subject: The Accused Abusers Nominated for Oscars Reply with quote

Gary Oldman and Kobe Bryant: The Accused Abusers Nominated for Oscars
James Franco may not have received an Academy Award nod due to recent sexual-misconduct allegations, but two other men accused of terrible things did.
BY Ira Madison III

Who gets to survive the #MeToo era?

Certainly not James Franco, who was snubbed Tuesday morning in the Oscars’ Best Actor category. It presumably has something to do with the Los Angeles Times publishing the accounts of five women who accused Franco of “inappropriate or sexually exploitative behavior.” In fact, the only nomination Franco’s The Disaster Artist picked up was one for Best Adapted Screenplay, which was written by two men who are not Franco: Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber. His film was otherwise shut out of the nominations altogether—a sharp contrast from the Golden Globes, where Franco took home the Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy trophy. This was, of course, days before the Times story hit.

Compare that with Christopher Plummer’s nomination from the otherwise ignored All the Money in the World. Voters seemed to rally behind the replacement for Kevin Spacey, who was removed from Ridley Scott’s film after his own sexual-misconduct scandal broke. But as we seem to be approaching a more “woke” awards season—including nominees of color and women like Mary J. Blige, Dee Rees, Kumail Nanjiani, Emily V. Gordon, Greta Gerwig, and Jordan Peele, to name a few—it seems that the #MeToo movement and the attempt to avoid another #OscarsSoWhite means that Hollywood is very much focused on what’s right in front of its face.

Take for instance how Franco’s notable absence loses its impact when you realize Gary Oldman still received a nomination for Best Actor.

Oldman, 59, was nominated for his portrayal of Winston Churchill in the film Darkest Hour (also nominated for Best Picture), but the character actor’s dark past is readily searchable on the internet and was reported on in the lead-up to awards season. It seems with men like Oldman and Mel Gibson, the Academy is ready to live and let live. The sins of the past are not the sins of today.

Read more:
https://www.thedailybeast.com/gary-oldman-and-kobe-bryant-the-accused-abusers-nominated-for-oscars?via=newsletter&source=DDMorning
_________________
O how clever, O how cute wink
Back to top
View user's profileSend private message
Annamite_en_Amérique



Joined: 20 Jun 2009
Posts: 1957
Location: USA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 3:42 pm    Post subject: Re: Fall-out of the #MeToo Movement Reply with quote

Viet Chick wrote:
Why James Franco Got Snubbed of an Oscar Nomination
Was James Franco’s Oscar Snub Due to His Sexual-Misconduct Allegations?
As other Hollywood players have been taken down by #MeToo allegations, Franco just lost a Best Actor nod.
BY Kevin Fallon

Less than two weeks ago, the Los Angeles Times published an investigation in which five women accused James Franco of “inappropriate or sexually exploitative behavior,” leading many to believe that the prolific actor would be the next powerful Hollywood player in the #MeToo movement whose career would fall in atonement for his actions.

Was Franco’s Oscar snub this morning the first punishment?

The Times investigation coincided with the prime of Franco’s campaign for what had seemed to be a sure-thing Best Actor nomination for The Disaster Artist, in which he stars as Tommy Wiseau, the notorious director and star of The Room, widely believed to be the worst film ever made. (In a meta twist, Franco also directs the film.)

In fact, Franco was delivering an acceptance speech at the Golden Globes for Best Actor in a Comedy when a series of tweets went viral that criticized the actor for wearing a Time’s Up pin to the ceremony in support of victims of sexual abuse and harassment. “Cute #TIMESUP pin James Franco. Remember the time you pushed my head down in a car towards your exposed penis & that other time you told my friend to come to your hotel when she was 17? After you had already been caught doing that to a different 17 year old?” read a tweet from one accuser.

(In response to the allegations, Franco has said: “I have my own side of this story, but I believe in, you know, these people that have been underrepresented getting their stories out enough that I will, you know, hold back things that I could say just because I believe in it that much. And if I have to take a knock because I’m not going to, you know, try and, you know, actively refute things, then I will, because I believe in it that much.”)

At a time when repercussions for men accused of misconduct have come with a sharp swinging axe, it would be logical to assume the allegations torpedoed the star’s Oscar chances.

Quote:
“In fact, voters’ affinity for Denzel Washington, whose nomination came as one of the biggest shocks Tuesday morning, may even be the biggest factor of all.”

The truth is that it’s impossible to tell how, if at all, the allegations and Franco’s response affected Oscar voters and his nomination, let alone make a judgment as to whether his exclusion in the Best Actor category could be viewed as the Academy condemning his behavior at all.

When Tiffany Haddish and Andy Serkis announced that Timothee Chalamet, Daniel Day-Lewis, Daniel Kaluuya, Gary Oldman, and Denzel Washington were the Best Actor contenders and not Franco, most pundits were shocked because the reasoning is more likely due to voters not warming up to his Disaster Artist performance—not because of any reaction to the allegations against him.

In fact, voters’ affinity for Denzel Washington, whose nomination came as one of the biggest shocks Tuesday morning, may even be the biggest factor of all.

When the Los Angeles Times story broke on January 11, voters had already been submitting their Oscar ballots for nearly a full week; voting began on January 5. When the story published, less than 48 hours remained before voting closed.

Who knows how many voters fill out their ballots early and how many wait until the last minute. But it’s highly likely that enough had submitted their choices and sealed his fate before the Times story broke.

Anecdotally, there were many voters who had already put Franco on their ballots, and regretted it.

Read more:
https://www.thedailybeast.com/was-james-francos-oscar-snub-due-to-his-sexual-misconduct-allegations?via=newsletter&source=DDMorning

_________________

Công Hòa Viêt-Nam Muôn Nam!
Back to top
View user's profileSend private message
Movie Buff



Joined: 31 Aug 2007
Posts: 767
Location: Movie Multiplex

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 3:45 pm    Post subject: Is the Era of #OscarsSoWhite Over? Reply with quote

Is the Era of #OscarsSoWhite Over?
By Michael Schulman

April Reign isn’t satisfied. Three years ago, the activist started the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite, in response to an all-white slate of acting nominees. The next year, another all-white list revived the hashtag and sent the Academy into a tailspin, resulting in an ambitious membership overhaul to diversify the voting body by race, gender, geography, and age. In 2017, the year “Moonlight” beat “La La Land” for Best Picture, the Academy invited nearly eight hundred new members—thirty-nine per cent female and thirty per cent non-white—among them Riz Ahmed, Dwayne Johnson, Leslie Jones, and Ruth Negga. Oh, and it lost one Harvey Weinstein.

The nominations announced on Tuesday morning, for the ninetieth Academy Awards, reflect a changed—but not transformed—Academy. After all, the voters are still predominantly white and male; twenty-eight per cent are female, and only thirteen per cent are non-white. Some more caveats: Oscar nominees hardly represent a cross-section of the industry. There are still woefully underrepresented groups, among them Hispanics, as the Times highlighted this past weekend. Two years in a row of diversified acting nominees don’t quite make a trend. And, as Reign tweeted after the nominations were announced:
    Until we are no longer lauding “firsts” after a 90 year history, until we can no longer count a traditionally underrepresented community's number of nominations in a particular category on our fingers, #OscarsSoWhite remains relevant. The fight continues.

One of the “firsts” she was alluding to was Rachel Morrison, who became the first woman ever to be nominated for Best Cinematography, for the beautifully shot “Mudbound.” The acting categories are—phew!—not all-white, with Octavia Spencer (“The Shape of Water”) and Mary J. Blige (“Mudbound”) in Best Supporting Actress and Daniel Kaluuya (“Get Out”) and Denzel Washington (“Roman J. Israel, Esq.”) in Best Actor. Washington’s surprise nomination—his eighth, a record for any black actor—may have something to do with the absence of James Franco, who during the nomination period was accused by five women of sexually inappropriate behavior.

The directing category was always going to be a heart-breaker: there are a maximum of ten slots for Best Picture but only five for directors. Greta Gerwig (“Lady Bird”) and Jordan Peele (“Get Out”) were both overlooked in the Golden Globe and BAFTA nominations, and yet both were nominated for the Oscar, along with the Mexican director Guillermo del Toro (“The Shape of Water”). Gerwig is the fifth female director ever to be nominated, and only Kathryn Bigelow has won, for “The Hurt Locker.” That’s a paltry record, but at least no one will have to repeat Natalie Portman’s line from the Golden Globes: “And here are the all-male nominees. . . . ” Peele is the fifth black directing nominee; none have won, including “Moonlight” ’s Barry Jenkins. The shocker in this category was the absence of Martin McDonagh, whose “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” has been on an unexpected awards tear; its star, Frances McDormand, is still the favorite for Best Actress, for playing a complicated heroine who embodies the rage and resolve of the #TimesUp movement.

This year’s nominees also include an eighty-nine-year-old gay screenwriter, nominated for adapting a gay love story (James Ivory, “Call Me by Your Name”); a Pakistani-American comedian, nominated with his wife for transforming the story of their courtship into a culture-clash rom-com (Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon, “The Big Sick”); a feature-length documentary by a black transgender director (Yance Ford, “Strong Island”); and the first black woman in forty-five years to be nominated for a screenplay award (Dee Rees, “Mudbound”).

All of which adds up to a broad showcase of talent from people from different walks of life. Another shuffle of the ballots might have included Hong Chau (“Downsizing”), Salma Hayek (“Beatriz at Dinner”), the gay director Luca Guadagnino (“Call Me by Your Name”), or Tiffany Haddish (“Girls Trip”)—who was a welcome presenter at this morning’s announcements. The Best Picture nominations might also have included “The Florida Project,” Sean Baker’s stunning portrait of poverty in America, which will be represented only by Willem Dafoe, who received a Supporting Actor nomination. Reign is correct that, as long as we’re counting on one hand, diversity pioneers are still exceptions to the rule. And it’s not easy to be an exception—ask Sidney Poitier, who said, in 1964, “Ever since I won the Oscar, the only questions the press seems to be interested in are what my feelings and actions are about civil-rights movements.”

The more significant shift than the year-to-year single-digit tallies may be in what we define as an “Oscar movie.” Alongside period behemoths like “Darkest Hour” and “The Post,” this year’s nine Best Picture nominations include a sensuous love story between two men, in which neither meets a tragic end; a teen coming-of-age story that prioritizes female friendship over boyfriend trouble; and a horror parable about racism. That those movies got made is cause for celebration. That the Academy foregrounded them means that we’re likely to get more where those came from. Onward!
_________________
Did you see that one?
Back to top
View user's profileSend private message
Drifter



Joined: 27 Oct 2005
Posts: 272

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 3:58 pm    Post subject: With No Big Oscar Snubs, Who Are We Mad At? Reply with quote

With No Big Oscar Snubs, Who Are We Mad At?
The 2018 Academy Awards nominations are in, and there's an outrageous shortage of reasons to be outraged.

https://youtu.be/bss9YtoVpCw


_________________
Drifting around the world
Back to top
View user's profileSend private message
murat



Joined: 13 Dec 2005
Posts: 1388
Location: New York

PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 5:33 pm    Post subject: The French Touch at the Oscars Reply with quote

The French Touch at the Oscars

Nine films and figures with links to France, Quebec, and Lebanon have been nominated for the Oscars, which will be taking place in Los Angeles on March 4, 2018. The ceremony will be broadcast live on ABC in the United States and on Canal+ in France.

Victor Caire and Gabriel Grapperon / Garden Party / Best Animated Short Film

This seven-minute film is the final-year project of six students at the MoPA animation school in Arles, France, and follows the adventures of a group of frogs as they explore a luxury mansion. Skillfully avoiding the pitfalls of anthropomorphism, this short film is the “most beautifully made 3D animated film in years,” says the website AnimatedShortFilms.net. The work was critically acclaimed at the Annecy International Animated Film Festival.

Timothée Chalamet / Call Me by Your Name / Best Actor

Timothée Chalamet was born in New York to an American mother and a French father, and is the youngest person nominated in this category since 1944. At just 22, he has already been praised for his performances in the television series Homeland and the Hollywood blockbuster Interstellar. In Call Me by Your Name (four nominations, including Best Picture), he plays Elio, a teenager exploring his homosexuality. The French-American actor is also on the cast of Lady Bird (five nominations) and will be on the bill of Woody Allen’s next movie, A Rainy Day.

Bruno Delbonnel / Darkest Hour / Best Cinematography

This isn’t the first time the French director of photography has been in the running for an Oscar. The Nancy-born Bruno Delbonnel has been commended for his work in Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s Amélie and A Very Long Engagement, as well as for Inside Llewyn Davis, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, and Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. In this movie retracing Winston Churchill’s first months in office, the Frenchman successfully recreated the moody half-light of England in 1940.

Alexandre Desplat / The Shape of Water / Best Original Music Score

The music by the French film composer has been the soundtrack to some of the greatest cinematic successes since the 1980s. Without missing a beat, Alexandre Desplat shifts from one genre to another, and the awards keep on coming. He received a César for Rust and Bone and The Ghost Writer, a Grammy for The King’s Speech, and a first Oscar for The Grand Budapest Hotel. His latest work, The Shape of Water, will be the ninth Oscar nomination for this multi-instrumentalist, who plays the piano, the trumpet, and the flute.

Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman / Loving Vincent / Best Animated Feature

The director is Polish, the co-screenwriter is English, but the whole movie takes place in France — first in Paris and then in Auvers-sur-Oise — looking back over the life of the renowned impressionist painter. As the first animated feature film made exclusively using handmade paintings, Loving Vincent literally brings the master’s works to life. A total of 94 paintings were fully recreated, and 31 were partially reproduced. “Van Gogh’s lifework is the real star of the movie,” said the director to France-Amérique when the film was released in the United States.

Ziad Doueiri / The Insult / Best Foreign Language Film

After studying in San Diego and 18 years spent in Los Angeles, the Lebanese director and Quentin Tarantino’s former assistant cameraman moved to Paris. “I love the work dynamic [in the United States], but I feel truly free in France. There is an incredible tolerance there,” he said to France-Amérique in an interview for the theatrical release of his fourth feature film. The movie portrays Lebanon haunted by the memory of its civil war and undermined by religious tensions.

Christopher Nolan / Dunkirk / Eight nominations including Best Picture

This historical movie is “one of the most difficult things [I have] ever done,” said Christopher Nolan. Filmed on land, in the sea, and in the air, the movie depicts a little-known event during World War II, when 400,000 soldiers were evacuated from Northern France in June 1940 after being trapped by the advancing German army. The movie had a budget of 100 million dollars, and many inhabitants of the Hauts-de-France region where it was filmed were cast as extras.

Agnès Varda and JR / Faces Places / Best Documentary Feature

The producer Charles Cohen is American, but everything in this movie is an ode to France. Agnès Varda, an iconic director of the Nouvelle Vague, and JR, whose giant portrait photos adorn the façades of buildings all over the world, travelled across France in a truck-cum-photo-booth. From Manche to Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, the pair make it their mission to take photo portraits of the people they meet. The result is a poetic road movie that picked up the award for Best Documentary at the Cannes Film Festival.

Denis Villeneuve / Blade Runner 2049 / Five nominations including Best Cinematography and Best Visual Effects

With Ryan Gosling, Jared Leto, and Harrison Ford, the French-Canadian director couldn’t have wished for a more highflying cast for the sequel to Blade Runner. The first opus directed by Ridley Scott in 1982 took place in a post-apocalyptic world, a setting recreated to the letter by this highly-awaited feature film. The dystopian movie was the “riskiest project of [Denis Villeneuve’s] career,” wrote Variety, and the director himself admitted he had never been put under such intense “artistic pressure.”

https://france-amerique.com/the-french-touch-at-the-oscars/?ct=t(FA_Hebdo_du_5_octobre_2017)
_________________
Roule, tambour d'Arcole!!
Back to top
View user's profileSend private message
Lyta



Joined: 31 Jul 2008
Posts: 111
Location: Among the Stars

PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:20 pm    Post subject: List of Oscar nominations, main categories Reply with quote

http://variety.com/2018/film/news/list-2018-oscar-nominations-1202668757/

Best Picture:
“Call Me by Your Name”
“Darkest Hour”
“Dunkirk”
“Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“Phantom Thread”
“The Post”
“The Shape of Water”
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Lead Actor:
Timothée Chalamet, “Call Me by Your Name”
Daniel Day-Lewis, “Phantom Thread”
Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”
Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”
Denzel Washington, “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”

Lead Actress:
Sally Hawkins, “The Shape of Water”
Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”
Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”
Meryl Streep, “The Post”

Supporting Actor:
Willem Dafoe, “The Florida Project”
Woody Harrelson, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Richard Jenkins, “The Shape of Water”
Christopher Plummer, “All the Money in the World”
Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Supporting Actress: (*)
Mary J. Blige, “Mudbound”
Allison Janney, “I, Tonya”
Lesley Manville, “Phantom Thread”
Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird”
Octavia Spencer, “The Shape of Water”

Director:
“Dunkirk,” Christopher Nolan
“Get Out,” Jordan Peele
“Lady Bird,” Greta Gerwig
“Phantom Thread,” Paul Thomas Anderson
“The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro

Best Foreign Language Film:
“A Fantastic Woman” (Chile)
“The Insult” (Lebanon)
“Loveless” (Russia)
“On Body and Soul (Hungary)
“The Square” (Sweden)

(*) I was hoping the Vietnamese actress Hông Châu made the list, but she didn't. Crying or Very sad
_________________
Twinkle twinkle little stars
Back to top
View user's profileSend private message
Internaute



Joined: 28 Dec 2007
Posts: 560

PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 6:03 pm    Post subject: Oscars: The Most Criminally Overlooked Performances Reply with quote

Oscars: The Most Criminally Overlooked Performances
Our Marlow Stern (senior entertainment editor) and Kevin Fallon (senior entertainment writer) debate the big issues ahead of the Academy Awards, airing March 4 on ABC.

Marlow: Well, it’s finally the week of the 90th Academy Awards, and, given all the insanity in this country, this glitzy diversion couldn’t have come at a better time. But unlike years past, I don’t feel too invested in many of these categories/performances. A big reason for that, I think, is the uninspired job the Academy did in recognizing this year’s standout performances, and the incredibly high number of shoo-in winners, e.g. Gary Oldman in Best Actor (for a prestige historical biopic) and Frances McDormand (for a partially tone-deaf, outsider’s view of America) in Best Actress, draining the ceremony of any suspense.

Kevin: None of the actors I would choose to win the four performance categories are even nominated, which happens nearly every year. So the more frustrating thing is that, while it at one point looked like these were going to be thrilling two-horse races, with Saoirse Ronan, Timothée Chalamet, Willem Dafoe, and Laurie Metcalf pegged to trade off wins with current frontrunners McDormand, Oldman, Sam Rockwell, and Allison Janney, the final leg of the race to Oscar Sunday has been a big ol’ predictable snooze. So let’s wake ourselves up by remembering our favorite performances that were overlooked this year. Who do you got?

Marlow: There are so many. Where do I start? Well, one of my absolute favorite performances of the year came courtesy of Haley Lu Richardson, who delivered what should have been a star-making (and Oscar-nominated) effort in the little-seen Columbus. Its premise sounds a bit dreary—a two-hander between a college student (Richardson) and a thirty-something (John Cho) exploring the architecture of Columbus, Indiana—yet as Richardson slowly peels back the layers of her character, we’re presented with something profound: an evocative portrait of a promising young woman paralyzed by her circumstances. I was also surprised that Rooney Mara received little to no awards buzz for her work in A Ghost Story. That pie-devouring scene alone is worthy of plaudits.

Marlow: Well, it’s finally the week of the 90th Academy Awards, and, given all the insanity in this country, this glitzy diversion couldn’t have come at a better time. But unlike years past, I don’t feel too invested in many of these categories/performances. A big reason for that, I think, is the uninspired job the Academy did in recognizing this year’s standout performances, and the incredibly high number of shoo-in winners, e.g. Gary Oldman in Best Actor (for a prestige historical biopic) and Frances McDormand (for a partially tone-deaf, outsider’s view of America) in Best Actress, draining the ceremony of any suspense.

Kevin: None of the actors I would choose to win the four performance categories are even nominated, which happens nearly every year. So the more frustrating thing is that, while it at one point looked like these were going to be thrilling two-horse races, with Saoirse Ronan, Timothée Chalamet, Willem Dafoe, and Laurie Metcalf pegged to trade off wins with current frontrunners McDormand, Oldman, Sam Rockwell, and Allison Janney, the final leg of the race to Oscar Sunday has been a big ol’ predictable snooze. So let’s wake ourselves up by remembering our favorite performances that were overlooked this year. Who do you got?

Marlow: There are so many. Where do I start? Well, one of my absolute favorite performances of the year came courtesy of Haley Lu Richardson, who delivered what should have been a star-making (and Oscar-nominated) effort in the little-seen Columbus. Its premise sounds a bit dreary—a two-hander between a college student (Richardson) and a thirty-something (John Cho) exploring the architecture of Columbus, Indiana—yet as Richardson slowly peels back the layers of her character, we’re presented with something profound: an evocative portrait of a promising young woman paralyzed by her circumstances. I was also surprised that Rooney Mara received little to no awards buzz for her work in A Ghost Story. That pie-devouring scene alone is worthy of plaudits.

Read more:
https://www.thedailybeast.com/oscars-2018-the-most-criminally-overlooked-performances-of-the-year?via=newsletter&source=AMDigestOrig_ABTest
_________________
Surfing the Web
Back to top
View user's profileSend private message
Movie Buff



Joined: 31 Aug 2007
Posts: 767
Location: Movie Multiplex

PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2018 3:53 pm    Post subject: This Year’s Biggest Academy Awards Controversies Reply with quote

This Year’s Biggest Academy Awards Controversies
Senior entertainment editor Marlow Stern and senior entertainment writer Kevin Fallon debate the big issues ahead of the Academy Awards, airing March 4 on ABC.
BY Marlow Stern and Kevin Fallon

https://www.thedailybeast.com/oscars-2018-this-years-biggest-controversies-from-ryan-seacrest-to-three-billboards?via=newsletter&source=AMDigestOrig_ABTest
_________________
Did you see that one?
Back to top
View user's profileSend private message
Couch Potato



Joined: 08 Apr 2006
Posts: 547
Location: In front of TV

PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2018 4:03 pm    Post subject: My 2018 Oscars Predictions Reply with quote

My 2018 Oscars Predictions
By Richard Brody

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/richard-brody/my-2018-oscars-predictions

Best Picture
“The Shape of Water”

“The Shape of Water” is a romantic, political, and movie-centric fantasy that blends a love-conquers-all tale with easy retrospective sociopolitical righteousness and a paean to classic Hollywood. I think that many of the more forward-thinking Academy members will prefer either “Get Out” or “Lady Bird,” and that, as they split the vote, “The Shape of Water” will win.

Best Director
Guillermo del Toro

If the likely Best Picture winner were the kind of movie that, like, say, “Darkest Hour,” presents its virtues more plainly, the director of a showier film would win; but since del Toro’s film is by far the gaudiest of the nominees, he’ll win for Best Director, too.

Best Actress
Frances McDormand

I think it’s between Sally Hawkins and McDormand, and I think that the righteous aggression of McDormand’s performance will prevail over the steadfast courage of Hawkins’s. Also, I think that “Three Billboards” will have suffered, entirely appropriately, from a wave of critical discernment following its festival successes, regarding its oblivious racism—but that McDormand’s performance won’t be tainted by it.

Best Actor
Gary Oldman

The Chalametians and the Kaluuyans will split the more forward-looking votes, leaving the field open for the Oldmen.

Best Supporting Actor
Willem Dafoe

Willem Dafoe’s performance is vigorous and heartwarming; in the grim situations of “The Florida Project,” he provides the magic word, hope. Christopher Plummer’s performance in “All the Money in the World” is superior, but it’s a reminder of an unpalatable irony, of the smiling depredations of wealth; who needs another reminder?

Best Supporting Actress
Laurie Metcalf

Five excellent performances (although the way that del Toro directs Octavia Spencer borders on caricature). Mary J. Blige’s is the most distinctive; Lesley Manville’s, the most precise; Allison Janney’s, the most showy (which is why I long thought she’d win); but without Metcalf’s performance, “Lady Bird” nearly doesn’t exist; I think she’ll win.

Adapted Screenplay
“Call Me by Your Name”

James Ivory’s adaptation of André Aciman’s novel shines with aphorisms and sells it with the father’s big monologue near the end.

Read the rest at the link above.
_________________
Back to top
View user's profileSend private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    AVENUE VIET Forum Index » Entertainment All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group