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The Most-Read Fiction of 2017

 
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Mr. Write



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 551
Location: USA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 12:19 pm    Post subject: The Most-Read Fiction of 2017 Reply with quote

The Most-Read Fiction of 2017
By Deborah Treisman
December 11, 2017

Kristen Roupenian’s “Cat Person” tops the list of our most-read short stories of 2017.

In the midst of a record-breaking response to last week’s short story, “Cat Person,” by Kristen Roupenian, who was making her début in our pages, we thought it would be a good time to take a look back at the year and see which pieces of fiction most excited readers in 2017. Of the five stories that drew the most readers online, four were written by women—Roupenian, Samantha Hunt, Zadie Smith, and Curtis Sittenfeld—and one by a man, F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Roupenian’s story of a flirtation conducted mostly by text, which leads to a catastrophically bad date, slyly skewers the false intimacy of electronic communication, the mercurial nature of sexual attraction, and a young woman’s reluctance to just say no. Hunt’s “A Love Story,” an excoriating yet lyrical take on our cultural views of motherhood and marriage, considers how many identities one person can contain. In “Crazy They Call Me,” Smith inhabits the late Billie Holiday and explores the inherent loneliness of performance. In Sittenfeld’s “The Prairie Wife,” a story that takes on the fluidity of sexual orientation and the sometimes malevolent influence of social media, the protagonist becomes obsessed with a former lover who has reinvented herself as a television personality. And Fitzgerald’s “The I.O.U.,” a previously unpublished story from 1920, is a sharp comic satire about the vagaries of the publishing industry—of his time, if not ours.

If you haven’t already read these, find out what readers are talking—and tweeting—about!
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Cat Person,” by Kristen Roupenian

“It was a terrible kiss, shockingly bad; Margot had trouble believing that a grown man could possibly be so bad at kissing.”

The I.O.U.,” by F. Scott Fitzgerald

A previously unpublished short story from 1920.

A Love Story,” by Samantha Hunt

“The list of potential reasons that my husband and I no longer have sex wakes me up at night. If I’m not already awake thinking about the coyotes.”

Crazy They Call Me,” by Zadie Smith

“Not only is there no more Eleanora, there isn’t any Billie, either. There is only Lady Day.”

The Prairie Wife,” by Curtis Sittenfeld

“Kirsten’s commute is when she really focusses on whether she has the power to destroy Lucy Headrick’s life.”
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Mr. Write



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 551
Location: USA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 12:21 pm    Post subject: The 25 most read NYorker Stories of 2017 Reply with quote

The Twenty-Five Most-Read New Yorker Stories of 2017
By Michael Luo
December 5, 2017

Determining The New Yorker’s “most popular” pieces of the year is a surprisingly fraught process. Should the measurement be page views, visitors, or some other criteria? From a financial standpoint, The New Yorker is increasingly dependent upon its loyal readers, people who come back again and again to our stories and, eventually, subscribe. As a result, when it came to selecting the most-read New Yorker stories of 2017, we decided to base our list on the total number of minutes that readers spent on an article. We felt that was the best measure of what we’re interested in—getting readers to engage deeply with what we do. The resulting list is a diverse collection. It includes a Books piece by Elizabeth Kolbert, about the human mind and the limits of reason; a pitch-perfect Daily Shouts by Colin Nissan, about a call between a 911 operator and someone who works from home; and an essay by the actress Molly Ringwald on her experiences of sexual harassment in Hollywood.

The balance, though, is composed of exclusive reporting: Ronan Farrow’s culture-shifting investigation of the movie mogul Harvey Weinstein; Ryan Lizza’s staggering phone conversation with the short-lived White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci; deeply reported profiles by Jane Mayer of Vice-President Mike Pence and Robert Mercer, the hedge-fund tycoon behind the Trump Presidency; Rachel Aviv’s investigation of guardians preying on the elderly; Evan Osnos’s exploration of the risk of nuclear war with North Korea, based on a reporting trip to Pyongyang; Patrick Radden Keefe’s investigations of the financier Carl Icahn and of the Sackler family’s involvement in the opioid crisis; Charles Bethea’s reporting on rumors that the Senate candidate Roy Moore was banned from an Alabama shopping center because of troubling interactions with teen-age girls; and much more. I’m biased, but to me it’s the kind of journalism worth coming back to repeatedly. If you’re not a loyal New Yorker reader now, we hope you become one in the new year. (To stay on top of what we do every day, try downloading our Today app and signing up for our daily newsletter.) Here’s a look back at our most engaging pieces of 2017.

Read more:
https://www.newyorker.com/culture/2017-in-review/the-twenty-five-most-read-new-yorker-stories-of-2017
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 2:00 pm    Post subject: Cat Person (Fiction) Reply with quote

Cat Person
By Kristen Roupenian

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/12/11/cat-person
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