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The Inevitability Of Impeachment
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Drifter



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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 12:36 am    Post subject: Re: How Trump's Impeachment Will Actually Play Out Reply with quote

ZeroG wrote:
7. They will likely fail
If you read our article on how Donald Trump could be impeached, you’d know that it is a bit of a complicated process. Both the House of Representatives and the Senate is controlled by the Republicans. The hope is that this presidency has been enough of a disaster that Republicans will turn against their own party and allow for the proceedings to continue. If the articles of impeachment go to a vote, they would need to get a majority of the House to support them. That would require at least 31 members of the Republican party to support the impeachment process. So the likelihood of that happening is slim to none.

This would be very depressing, if not for the fact that we see more and more Republicans jumping ship. We need to keep up our optimism here.

Worse comes to worst, Democrats may well regain majority in Congress next year. Plus, there's the possibility that Mueller will come up with enough evidence to warrant impeachment. Cool
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:49 am    Post subject: Trump impeachment: House must act now... Reply with quote

Trump impeachment: House must act now to keep our Republic
Steve Cohen, Luis Gutierrez, Al Green, Marcia Fudge and Adriano Espaillat
USA Today
There are many uncontested facts that suggest Trump is an extraordinary threat to our democracy and constitutional order. We see no reason for delay.

The Constitution provides that “the House of Representatives shall have the sole power of impeachment” and that “The president ... shall be removed from office on impeachment for ... high crimes and misdemeanors.”

The House Judiciary Committee, when it considered articles of impeachment against former president Richard Nixon in 1974, addressed the question of what constitutes a “high crime” or “misdemeanor.” Such impeachable offenses need not be limited to criminal acts, a staff report concluded, but should include “constitutional wrongs that subvert the structure of government, or undermine the integrity of office and even the Constitution itself, and thus are ‘high’ offenses.”

Several of President Trump’s actions since taking office meet this high standard. They were not simply inappropriate or wrong; they threaten to undermine our fundamental constitutional structure, our national security and our democracy. In light of this, we have introduced five articles of impeachment against Trump and called for immediate impeachment hearings.

The articles address a range of Trump’s actions, from obstruction of justice and violations of the Constitution’s foreign and domestic emoluments clauses to undermining the independence of the federal judiciary and the freedom of the press.

We recognize that several investigations are ongoing, including one led by special counsel Robert Mueller into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election and possible collusion with the Trump campaign. We support a continuation of these efforts to ensure complete transparency and accountability. Sufficient facts, however, already exist in the public record to warrant the start of impeachment proceedings in Congress. Given the magnitude of the constitutional crisis engendered by Trump’s actions, we see no reason for delay.

Read more:
https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2017/11/19/trump-impeachment-inquiry-house-must-act-now-cohen-guttierez-green-fudge-espaillat-column/878920001/
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Drifter



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:55 am    Post subject: Short of impeachment, 6 ways to limit damage Reply with quote

Short of impeachment, 6 ways Congress can limit Trump damage to America
The Constitution is not enough to rein in a president who loves dictators, hates the press, pursues his own wealth and may stumble into nuclear war.
Ilann M. Maazel, Opinion contributor

Thanks to Donald Trump’s disregard for the law, ethics and norms of presidential behavior, it’s clear our government of laws needs serious reform. We should amend the Constitution to limit presidential pardons and make it easier to remove unfit presidents.

That will be complicated, and could take years. Fortunately, most reform can be passed by Congress now, in a six-part Save America Act.

Mandate disclosure of tax returns
Congress should require the Internal Revenue Service to release all tax returns of all candidates for president and vice president. We shouldn’t have to guess at the financial motivations, interests and vulnerabilities of the most powerful officials in the country. Does Trump owe money to the Russians? The Chinese? He works for us, not them —let’s see the returns.

End outside income for presidents
No paid speeches, gifts, book royalties or businesses on the side. Only U.S. Treasuries or a truly blind trust. Trump has already violated the Constitution by accepting money from foreign governments, as my client Sarah Chayes recently argued in federal court. But the problem transcends foreign corruption. Americans need to know that when the president makes a decision, it is for the good of the country, not his own bottom line. When Trump conducts official business at Mar-A-Lago, or negotiates with his Washington, D.C., hotel there is no line between Trump the moneymaker and Trump the president. Presidents earn $400,000 a year, plus an expense allowance. That’s plenty.

Outlaw nepotism
Whatever one thinks of Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner, loyalty in the executive branch should be to country and Constitution, not dad. Anti-nepotism laws already cover executive agencies and cabinet secretaries. They should also apply where it matters most: in the White House.

Pass the bipartisan Graham-Booker bill
The bill prevents the president and attorney general from firing Robert Mueller or any special counsel without judicial approval. You shouldn’t be able to fire the person investigating whether you’re a criminal. In these hyper-partisan times, when the same party controls Congress and the White House, Congress is no check on the president. Let’s make sure a special counsel is.

Clarify that a special counsel can prosecute a president
If a president gunned down 100 people on Pennsylvania Avenue, does anyone doubt he could be prosecuted? The same rule should apply to treason, obstruction of justice and other crimes. No one is above the law. Not even Trump.

Impose a two-person nuclear strike rule
Though Congress has the power to declare war, short nuclear response times have made the president the de facto nuclear decision-maker. No single person should be able to annihilate the world. Congress should require a congressional declaration of war for any nuclear first strike, and approval of the Secretary of Defense for any responsive nuclear strike. In 1974, Defense Secretary James Schlesinger issued a secret, illegal order to prevent a depressed, drunken President Nixon from unleashing nuclear Armageddon. This is no way to deal with an unhinged, delusional or psychotic commander in chief. Congress, please step up.

POLICING THE USA: A look at race, justice, media
Trump is doing his best to destroy the planet, bankrupt the country and stumble into a nuclear war. He loves dictators, lies more than Pinocchio and despises the free press. His only goal is to increase his own wealth, fame and, above all, power.

The Founders created the Constitution to deal with just such a man. Separation of powers, federalism an independent judiciary — they all were designed to prevent authoritarian rule.

But it is not enough. Congress must rein in the sultanistic, imperial presidency for Trump and for all future presidents.

It’s time to drain the White House swamp. Pass the Save America Act.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2017/11/08/short-impeachment-six-ways-congress-can-limit-trump-damage-to-america-ilann-maazel-column/838533001/
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Du Khach
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2017 12:11 pm    Post subject: Why Founding Father Madison Would Support Impeachment Reply with quote

Should Trump Be Impeached? Why Founding Father James Madison Would Support Impeachment
Delegates argued at the Constitutional Convention that a president should be impeached if he colluded with "foreign powers."
by Max Kutner

More than two centuries ago, when delegates at the Constitutional Convention were debating what offenses should be grounds to impeach the United States president, statesman James Madison suggested, “He might betray his trust to foreign powers.”

President Donald Trump’s relationship with Russia is the subject of investigation. But the handful of Democratic lawmakers who have filed articles of impeachment against him have cited reasons other than Madison’s centuries-old “foreign powers” justification.

The delegates discussed the topic of impeachment on July 20, 1787 at the Constitutional Convention, which met for a few months in Philadelphia. The convention was meant to address problems with the Articles of Confederation. From the meetings came the Constitution, which went into effect in 1789.

“The big question at the convention was how broadly or narrowly to define impeachable offenses,” said Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, a history museum in Philadelphia.

At the gathering, George Mason, a delegate from Virginia, wanted to use the word “maladministration” as a cause for impeachment. But Madison, who is considered the “father of the Constitution” and later became the fourth president of the United States, worried “maladministration” was too vague. So he suggested they instead use “high crimes and misdemeanors.”

Madison went on to provide examples of such wrongdoings by a president. “He might lose his capacity after his appointment. He might pervert his administration into a scheme of peculation or oppression,” Madison suggested. “He might betray his trust to foreign powers.”

Later at the convention, James Iredell, who went on to become a Supreme Court justice, said, according to Harvard legal scholar Cass Sunstein, “I suppose the only instances, in which the president would be liable to impeachment, would be where he had received a bribe, or had acted from some corrupt motive or other.” Such a bribe, Iredell added, might come “from a from a foreign power, and, under the influence of that bribe, had address enough with the Senate, by artifices and misrepresentations, to seduce their consent to a pernicious treaty.”

The delegates finalized the impeachment language and ratified the Constitution. The final language, in Article II, says an officer can face impeachment for “treason, bribery or other high crimes and misdemeanors.” But those offenses are thought to include Madison’s “foreign powers” criterion, according to the National Convention Center’s Rosen. Princeton University historian Keith Whittington has pointed out that the Constitution states only the general principle of impeachment and leaves Congress to put forward the specifics.

Madison’s point was not forgotten. In 1974, as the House Judiciary Committee considered the impeachment of former President Richard Nixon, a committee report mentioned the comments from both Madison and Iredell. The “foreign powers” line appears often in modern historian’s accounts of the Constitutional Convention.

The topic of foreign influence on Trump’s presidential campaign is the subject of a Department of Justice special counsel investigation and probes by three congressional committees. The United States intelligence community published an assessment in January stating that Russia meddled in the 2016 election, but the topic of collusion is one of partisan debate. Trump has repeatedly said there was “no collusion.” Congressional investigators are divided on the subject, even as the list grows of undisclosed contacts that Trump campaign officials had with people connected to the Kremlin or who claimed to have connections.

“We have not had one witness or one shred of evidence” suggesting collusion, Representative Tom Rooney, a Republican member of the House Intelligence Committee, told Newsweek in late October. But Representative Adam Schiff, the Democratic ranking member of the committee, said, “You have to, I think, willfully blind yourself to what we’ve seen to suggest there’s no evidence.”

Several House Democrats have called for Trump’s impeachment. On November 15, six of them filed multiple articles of impeachment, alleging obstruction of justice, violations of the foreign and domestic emoluments clauses, the undermining of the freedom of the press and the undermining of the federal judiciary. In response, a Republican National Committee spokesman called the move “a baseless radical effort that the vast majority of Americans disagree with.” Previously, two more House Democrats had called for Trump’s removal through impeachment. Such calls have not received widespread support from Democratic leaders.

Press reports have cited Madison’s “foreign powers” line when discussing the possibility of a Trump impeachment. But none of the lawmakers appear to have directly cited it in their reasons. The closest they have come is alleging that Trump violated the emoluments clauses of the Constitution, which restrict gifts that U.S. officials can receive from foreign governments. Ethics watchdogs have accused Trump of violating those clauses when foreign officials stay at his Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C.

The lawmakers have also mentioned the Trump campaign’s alleged ties to Russia, but they used that to discuss possible obstruction of justice, and not to address the ties themselves. “As the investigations move forward, additional evidence supporting additional articles of impeachment may emerge,” Representative Brad Sherman, who filed impeachment articles, said in a July statement. “However, as to obstruction of justice...the evidence we have is sufficient to move forward now.”

The House of Representatives has impeached just two presidents: Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton. The Senate did not convict either of them. Nixon resigned after the House Judiciary Committee launched an impeachment investigation but before the House considered resolutions.

http://www.newsweek.com/should-trump-be-impeached-james-madison-wanted-prevent-foreign-influence-718815
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2017 2:40 am    Post subject: What Is GOP, The Cabinet Waiting For? Reply with quote

Joe On President Trump's Instability: What Is GOP, The Cabinet Waiting For?
In a new editorial, the New York Daily News called President Donald Trump 'profoundly unstable' following Trump's series of tweets on Wednesday. The Morning Joe panel wonders what it will take for the GOP and Trump's cabinet to act.

https://youtu.be/zw7NuTirCTA


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 02, 2017 12:12 am    Post subject: Donald Trump At "Watergate Moment" Reply with quote

Donald Trump At "Watergate Moment"
Trump and others are now at a "Watergate moment," said Sen. Richard Blumenthal. "What did he know and when did he know it?" [Aw come on now, of course he knew everything from the start. Or Steve Bannon knew it.]

https://youtu.be/1e9jsT9KBR8


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 02, 2017 12:14 am    Post subject: Vote To Impeach Will Happen Next Week Reply with quote

Vote To Impeach President Donald Trump Will Happen Next Week
“Impeachment was designed for times such as this and presidents such as Trump,” says Congressman Al Green, who plans to bring impeachment up for a vote next week.

https://youtu.be/eZbLAB4r810


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 02, 2017 12:18 am    Post subject: Why We Should "Normalize" Impeachment Reply with quote

Ezra Klein: Why We Should "Normalize" Impeachment
Ezra Klein explains why impeaching Donald Trump doesn't require him having committed a crime. Lawrence O’Donnell says ‘high crimes and misdemeanors’ means whatever the Senate says it does.

https://youtu.be/N8h8tjCjBjc


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 03, 2017 9:14 pm    Post subject: Do You Even NEED Trump Anymore? Reply with quote

Mitch McConnell Asked a Question He CAN'T Answer, "Do You Even NEED Trump Anymore?"
Senate Republican Majority Leader and worlds first successful human-bullfrog hybrid, Mitch McConnell is promoting his tax plan, but is QUICK to duck George Stephanopoulos' questions when the topic turns to Trump

https://youtu.be/LCeSqLj-u_g


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2017 1:55 am    Post subject: Impeachment likely if Trump fires Mueller Reply with quote

View video and read article :

http://www.newsweek.com/dem-warns-trump-impeachment-if-investigators-fired-755498
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