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Antep



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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2018 4:20 pm    Post subject: "Truth isn't Truth" Reply with quote

Shep Smith Owning laughing at Guiliani 'Truth Isn't Truth' + Cohen Update

https://youtu.be/X3PNGDLSnEE


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2018 4:34 pm    Post subject: Et tu, Brute? Reply with quote

Trump White House Lawyer COOPERATING with Trump Russia Investigation
David Pakman Show
Published on Aug 20, 2018
--The New York Times reveals that Trump White House attorney Don McGahn has been cooperating with Robert Mueller's Trump-Russia investigation, and the President has completely misunderstood the context of that cooperation

https://youtu.be/1NNscvBGs3M


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2018 4:41 pm    Post subject: One after the other, they flip Reply with quote

Donald Trump Freaks Out After Learning White House Counsel Working With Mueller
The Ring of Fire
Published on Aug 20, 2018
Donald Trump has engaged in a days-long Twitter tirade over the fact that White House counsel Don McGahn has been cooperating with Robert Mueller’s investigation for MONTHS, and he even sat for about 30 hours of testimony. Some believe that McGahn was simply turning on Trump before Trump could turn on him, but whatever the reason for this cooperation, it has Trump spooked, as Ring of Fire’s Farron Cousins explains.

https://youtu.be/xXPrCnTIhsA



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President Trump Lawyers Left In The Dark On McGahn’s Mueller Interviews
MSNBC
Published on Aug 20, 2018
After the New York Times reported that President Trump’s lawyers do not know what was said behind closed doors between White House Counsel Don McGahn and Robert Mueller, a panel on “Kasie DC” discusses the implications.

https://youtu.be/aC6oRcHG3EA


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 12:50 am    Post subject: Anderson Cooper reacts to Giuliani's false statement Reply with quote

Anderson Cooper reacts to Giuliani's false statement
CNN
Published on Aug 20, 2018
Anderson Cooper fact-checks Rudy Giuliani's latest claims about the Mueller investigation.

https://youtu.be/ZUU1Vd2E3DY


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Annamite_en_Amérique



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PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 11:45 pm    Post subject: Swamp Chronicles Reply with quote

With the Manafort Convictions and Cohen Plea, President Trump Has Been Implicated in a Criminal Conspiracy
Adam Davidson, August 21, 2018

The President of the United States is now, formally, implicated in a criminal conspiracy to mislead the American public in order to influence an election. Were he not President, Donald Trump himself would almost certainly be facing charges. This news came in what must be considered the most damaging single hour of a deeply troubled Presidency.

On Tuesday morning, it was still possible to believe that Trump’s former campaign chair Paul Manafort might be exonerated and that his longtime attorney Michael Cohen would only face charges for crimes stemming from his taxicab business. Such events would have supported Trump’s effort to portray the Mueller investigation as a “witch hunt” perpetrated by overzealous, partisan prosecutors. By late afternoon, though, Cohen, the President’s long-time adviser, fixer, and, until recently, personal attorney, told a judge that Trump explicitly instructed him to break campaign-finance laws by paying two women not to publicly disclose the affairs they had with Trump. At precisely the same moment, Manafort was learning of his fate: guilty on eight counts of bank and tax fraud, with the jury undecided on ten other counts.

The question can no longer be whether the President and those closest to him broke the law. That is settled. Three of the people closest to Trump as he ran for and won the Presidency have now pleaded guilty or have been convicted of significant federal crimes: Michael Cohen, Paul Manafort, and Michael Flynn. The question now becomes far narrower and, for Trump, more troubling: What is the political impact of a President’s criminal liability being established in a federal court? How will Congress respond? And if Congress does not act, how will voters respond in the midterm elections?

The President spoke to reporters soon after the Manafort and Cohen news. He said that the Manafort guilty verdicts made him feel “very badly,” but they “had nothing to do with Russian collusion.” He then walked away, as reporters shouted questions about the Cohen guilty plea. While his comment was, technically, correct—neither man’s guilt was for crimes involving the Trump campaign colluding with Russia—the President would be unwise to consider the outcome of either case beneficial. Manafort was convicted of crimes he committed while being paid tens of millions for serving the interests of oligarchs and politicians closely allied with the Kremlin. The trial made clear that Manafort was in tremendous financial distress, in hock to some of those same oligarchs, just when he became Trump’s unpaid campaign chair. The trial contained a central but unasked question: What did this desperate man do when he needed money and had only one valuable asset—access to Trump and his campaign? Manafort, who faces decades in prison, is under renewed pressure to coöperate with Mueller’s investigation and to answer that question.

It is the Cohen plea that should be the most alarming, though, to the President, precisely because it has nothing to do with Russia. Instead, it demonstrates a comfort with law-breaking by people at the core of the Trump Organization. Cohen’s guilty plea is part of a long trail of evidence. Last month, a tape recording of Trump speaking with Cohen showed that the President had familiarity and comfort with the idea of using shell companies to disguise payoffs that, we now know, were illegal. This echoed evidence from depositions in a lawsuit filed by the New York Attorney General against the Trump Foundation that suggested deceptive—and almost certainly illegal—practices were standard at the Trump Organization. Cohen admitted in open court that Trump directed him to violate campaign-finance laws. Later in the day, Cohen’s attorney, Lanny Davis, issued a public statement that included these lines: “Today [Cohen] stood up and testified under oath that Donald Trump directed him to commit a crime by making payments to two women for the principal purpose of influencing an election. If those payments were a crime for Michael Cohen, then why wouldn’t they be a crime for Donald Trump?”

The day had a feeling, on one level, of history, of recognizing that one is living through moments that will become central parts of the Trump Presidency. At the same time, the day felt small and shabby, as we learned more details about the crude crimes of those who surround the President. Manafort and Cohen did not commit clever, subtle crimes; they blatantly and crudely lied. They lied to banks to get money; they lied to the I.R.S. In Manafort’s case, he instructed countless support people to lie on his behalf. In Cohen’s case, it was Trump demanding that a subordinate do the lying. The crimes were not unravelled by brilliant detective work. All it took was law-enforcement officials looking.

It is conventional wisdom these days that views of Trump are fixed: those who hate him can’t hate him more and those who love him can’t be budged, and, all the while, Republicans in Congress will do nothing, no matter what he says or does. There is another way of understanding the impact of Tuesday’s news. Trump was widely viewed to be morally challenged, a man comfortable with pushing the limits of legality, before he was elected. Perhaps he did business with some bad characters, maybe he engaged in some light civil fraud. But that fact had been priced into the election and, anyway, we don’t impeach Presidents for things they did before they were in office. The possibility of the Trump campaign colluding with Russia was a separate matter that was worth investigating because it had to do with his election. Keeping these two matters separate—Trump’s private business and possible campaign collusion—has been an obsession of Trump’s, for obvious reasons. His business cannot withstand this level of scrutiny.

The Cohen plea and the Manafort indictment establish that this separation is entirely artificial. Trump did not isolate his private business from his public run for office. He behaved the same, with the same sorts of people, using the same techniques to hide his actions. It is impossible, after Tuesday, to imagine that a responsible congressional investigation wouldn’t thoroughly examine every deal with which Cohen was involved and wouldn’t even more aggressively seek to understand Manafort’s links to Russian figures. These two men are now convicted financial fraudsters, each found guilty of precisely eight counts of various financial crimes, though nobody, glancing at their record, would imagine this is an exhaustive list. Tuesday was not the end of an examination of their record; it is much more like a beginning. Manafort has another trial ahead, as well as a possible retrial for the ten counts for which the jury could not reach a consensus; Cohen is all but screaming that he has more to share.

What will this add up to? Well, at first, nothing. The Republican leadership has, indeed, made clear that its instinctive response to any Trump outrage is silence. And the increasingly desperate Trump apologias have already been tried: this has nothing to do with Russia, nothing to do with Trump, it’s a witch hunt, the President can’t be indicted.

It would take some remarkable news to shake Republicans from their moral slumber; while Tuesday’s events should be more than enough to do so, it is already clear that it isn’t. However, it could shake that small portion of the electorate that voted for Trump but never embraced him fully; even a slight downturn in Republican turnout could well mean a victory for Democrats in the midterms, which, in turn, will guarantee a far more aggressive—and far more public—investigation into the activities of Trump and his shadier cronies. Tuesday’s news also helps build an increasingly compelling case for impeachment and removal from office. It is now clear that the President engaged in at least one conspiracy to hide the truth from the public in an election he won with a tiny margin in three states.

We will know far more about Trump, his business, and his campaign in the months to come. The country will be moving down two tracks simultaneously. There is one track of investigation and prosecution in which more of the people close to Trump fall or coöperate and the man himself appears increasingly vulnerable and desperate.

There is the other track, though, in which he remains President. He will likely successfully transform the Supreme Court and imperil the environment, immigrants, consumers of financial products, and others. Those who carefully study Trump and those around him know where this story likely ends—in humiliation and collapse—but we can’t underestimate his embrace of mendacity and deflection. Shortly after the fateful hour, Trump flew to West Virginia for a rally with some of his strongest supporters. The crowd, referring to Hillary Clinton, chanted, “Lock her up.”

https://www.newyorker.com/news-desk/swamp-chronicles/the-president-has-been-implicated-in-a-criminal-conspiracy
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GalleonFlame



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PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2018 1:16 am    Post subject: How Manafort’s conviction could affect the Russia probe Reply with quote

How Paul Manafort’s conviction could affect the Russia probe
PBS NewsHour
Published on Aug 21, 2018
A jury found President Trump's 2016 campaign chairman Paul Manafort guilty on eight counts of bank and tax fraud, and failing to disclose foreign bank accounts. A mistrial was declared on 10 other counts. Judy Woodruff learns more from William Brangham and Jessica Roth of Yeshiva University Cardozo School of Law.

https://youtu.be/UqA-FivlDKQ


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Annamite_en_Amérique



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PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2018 1:12 pm    Post subject: Who’s Happiest about Manafort? Reply with quote

Satire from The Borowitz Report
Ostriches Celebrate Manafort Verdict

AFRICA (The Borowitz Report)—Ostriches across Africa erupted into spontaneous celebrations on Tuesday over the guilty verdict of Donald J. Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort.

As the verdict was read out in open court, jubilant ostriches broke into what was described as an orgy of running, squawking, and indiscriminate mating.

An emotional ostrich spokesperson called the verdict “a great day for the entire ostrich species.”

“Waiting for the verdict over the past few days has been incredibly nerve-racking,” the ostrich said. “Many of us have been glued to the TV. Some of us were too stressed to watch and kept our heads in the sand. But tonight we are all partying.”

According to wildlife officials, ostriches held celebratory rallies in dozens of African capitals, where they were joined by equally delirious pythons.

https://www.newyorker.com/humor/borowitz-report/ostriches-celebrate-manafort-verdict
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2018 1:15 pm    Post subject: The Worst Hour of His Entire Life Reply with quote

“The Worst Hour of His Entire Life”: Cohen, Manafort, and the Twin Courtroom Dramas That Changed Trump’s Presidency
Is this finally the President’s accountability moment?
By Susan B. Glasser

With Michael Cohen’s guilty plea and Paul Manafort’s criminal convictions, Tuesday was a day for the optimists who think they can finally see the beginning of the end of the Trump Presidency.

Just before 5 P.M. on Tuesday, the afternoon of August 21, 2018, became one of those unforgettable Trump news cycles, like the moment when the “Access Hollywood” tape was released, on October 7, 2016, and Donald Trump’s voice was heard bragging about sexually forcing himself on women, or when the White House suddenly announced, on May 9, 2017, that Trump had fired the F.B.I. director, James Comey, instantly conjuring the comparisons to Richard Nixon and Watergate that have shadowed him ever since. Tuesday’s breathtaking news unfolded in the course of a single hour in two separate federal courtrooms—one in New York City, the other in Alexandria, Virginia—where, at virtually the same time, Trump’s former attorney Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to eight federal counts and Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, was found guilty on eight federal counts brought by the special counsel, Robert Mueller. As all this played out, I happened to be interviewing one of Trump’s main legal nemeses, President Obama’s former White House ethics czar, Norm Eisen.

Eisen, a Harvard Law School classmate of Obama’s, has reinvented himself in the Trump era as one of this President’s most persistent legal scourges, filing multiple complaints against the President and his advisers as chairman of the watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. One of them is a court case arguing that Trump, by refusing to disengage from his businesses, is illegally receiving payments from foreign governments seeking to influence him, in violation of the Constitution’s ban on such “emoluments.” In another legal filing, which resulted in a referral to the Justice Department, CREW pointed out that Trump had failed to properly disclose the funds used to reimburse Cohen for his pre-election hush-money payments to Stephanie Clifford, an adult-film actress whose screen name is Stormy Daniels, who says that she had an extramarital affair with Trump.

Eisen and I weren’t talking about that at 4:52 P.M. on Tuesday. We were talking about his new history of Prague, which Eisen’s mother fled as a Holocaust survivor and to which Eisen had triumphantly returned as Obama’s Ambassador to the Czech Republic. But Prague and its stubborn attachment to democracy, despite the predations of the twentieth century, would have to wait. Our conversation was interrupted multiple times by the courtroom news, most notably that Cohen’s guilty plea included the revelation that the President himself had ordered the payments to both Clifford and Karen McDougal, a former Playboy playmate, who also claims to have had an affair with Trump, that were designed to buy their silence. In his court appearance on Tuesday, Cohen admitted that that money was an illegal campaign contribution designed to “affect the outcome of the Presidential election”—and that he gave the money on Trump’s express command. In other words, the President of the United States was, for all intents and purposes, his unindicted co-conspirator.

I read Eisen this information as it appeared on my Twitter feed. “This is the worst hour of Trump’s Presidency,” he said. “No, make that his entire life.”

The walls are closing in on Donald Trump. Many of those he picked to lead both his Presidential campaign and his White House face legal jeopardy from Mueller’s investigation and may start to turn on him, following the path of Cohen, who once bragged of his willingness to “take a bullet” for Trump. Unless he flips or is pardoned, Manafort may spend the rest of his life in prison, after Tuesday’s conviction. He is the first head of a Presidential campaign since Nixon’s to be convicted of a crime. Trump’s former national-security adviser has pleaded guilty to a charge brought by Mueller. So has the longtime Manafort protégé tapped by Trump to organize his Presidential Inauguration. Even Trump’s current White House counsel has apparently been coöperating with the special counsel for months, and the rest of the White House isn’t fully aware of what he has been saying. There is a crisis engulfing Trump’s Presidency, and it is a real one.

But, as with many of the breathtaking Trump-news cycles before it, we still don’t have an answer to the key question raised by Tuesday’s legal developments: Will Trump himself ever face the reckoning that more and more of his advisers and associates are confronting? Until now, Trump has escaped any accountability for his actions, and there is still no clear path showing how that will change. He has lied with abandon, openly bragged about firing the F.B.I. director in an effort to halt the Mueller investigation, and laughed at complaints from what he calls a craven élite when he has flaunted the basic norms of American civic life. He has mocked the institutions of our democracy, taunted friends and allies, and surrounded himself with advisers willing to lie, cheat, and bend the rules on his behalf—and their own. Many of them have already faced harsh consequences for those actions, or will eventually.

But the Constitution designates only one form of accountability for the President, beyond rejection at the ballot box: impeachment and trial by Congress. The deafening silence from the Republican officials who currently control both houses of Congress suggests the remoteness of that approach, for now at least. There was no statement of concern from the Speaker of the House or the Majority Leader of the Senate after the split-screen courtroom dramas. There were no reports of concerned Republican Party elders gathering behind closed doors to demand action, or committee chairmen vowing to investigate the President, partisan politics be damned. And, in the next ten weeks, until the midterm elections decide whether Republicans will keep their hold over Capitol Hill, there isn’t likely to be any.

Still, Tuesday’s news suggested that the system had struck back, if not promising full accountability then promising, at least, some halting steps toward it. In New York, at the courthouse where Cohen pleaded guilty, the top F.B.I. agent on the case, William F. Sweeney, Jr., made a remarkable statement. “As we all know, the truth can only remain hidden for so long before the F.B.I. brings it to light,” he said. “We are all expected to follow the rule of law, and the public expects us—the F.B.I.—to enforce the law equally.” Trump’s name wasn’t mentioned, but it didn’t have to be: the message was unmistakable. “The rule of law applies,” Robert Khuzami, the deputy U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, who was in charge of prosecuting the case, said. “We are a nation of laws, and the essence of this case is justice, and that is an equal playing field for all persons in the eyes of the law.”

But how, and when, will justice apply to Trump, if there is no one willing to apply it? Not long after that courthouse press conference, John Roberts, a White House reporter at Trump’s favorite media outlet, Fox News, tweeted, “Source close to @realDonaldTrump tells Fox News ‘remember, the President cannot be indicted.’ ” There are some in legal circles who believe that a President could, in fact, be indicted, but that proposition has never been tested in the courts, and official Justice Department policy (dictated under the Administration of the last President to be impeached, Bill Clinton) stipulates that the President cannot be indicted, leaving Congress as the sole arbiter of Trump’s fate.

And so ignoring the trouble seems to be the initial White House strategy. That is exactly what Trump himself did in the hours after the news, when he flew to West Virginia for a campaign rally at which he never uttered the words “Manafort” or “Cohen.” Just before 9 P.M., Trump finished his rally, and a quick glance at the Fox News home page showed that, instead of leading with the day’s huge Trump news, this story was splashed across the top of the site: “Mollie Tibbetts murder suspect is illegal immigrant from Mexico.” Soon, the Fox News host Sean Hannity, one of the President’s defenders and confidants, came on the air and delivered a long opening monologue recapping the day’s events. He suggested that they were not of real consequence to the President, because none of them proved, or had anything much to do with, “Russia collusion.”

By Wednesday morning, Trump had started tweeting about the news as if the twin legal setbacks were merely a new set of inconvenient facts that he could dismiss with his trademark of poorly capitalized bluster and blatant untruths. Cohen was a terrible lawyer, he joked, and Manafort was a “brave man” who had refused to “break.” The President signed off with his signature attack line: “Witch hunt!”

On the Times site, meanwhile, a banner announced, “Cohen Pleads Guilty, Implicating the President.” Even the conservative Drudge Report managed to convey the day’s seriousness. “Trump Hell Hour,” its headline read.

It may be months, or even years, before we know what Tuesday afternoon’s events really mean. The “Access Hollywood” tape did not, in fact, cement Trump’s defeat in the 2016 election, no matter how much it initially seemed like it would. Comey’s firing set in motion the Mueller investigation, but it may or may not deserve the comparisons to Nixon’s Saturday Night Massacre that were so quickly made about it. We don’t know the end of the Trump story yet.

But Tuesday was a day for the optimists who think they can finally see the beginning of the end of that story, those like Norm Eisen, who are convinced that the institutions of American democracy are proving resilient in the face of Trump’s assault. While Cohen was in the courtroom entering the guilty plea that would place the President in legal and political jeopardy, Eisen was trying to convince me with his argument. Part of it was his study of history and his new book, “The Last Palace,” about a city that in the past century had seen both Nazi and Soviet invasions but had overcome both. “Democracy writ large has beaten illiberalism again and again, and that’s why I have optimism that today’s struggle will be no exception,” Eisen told me on Tuesday, which also happened to be the fiftieth anniversary of Soviet tanks rolling in to Prague to crush the city’s 1968 uprising. “There is an inexorable bend toward accountability.” He then reeled off all the possible ways in which Trump, facing legal and political jeopardy, could be held accountable. He returned to this theme later in the conversation, after we had a few minutes to absorb the hour’s momentous news. “How marvellous that we are having this conversation exactly when not one but two federal verdicts prove the point,” he said.

A few hours after our interview, an Op-Ed by Eisen and two others appeared on the Times’ Web site. He had sent in the final draft while we listened to the breaking news about Manafort and Cohen. It pointed out that, whatever else the day’s events heralded for the future, they had already proved one thing: despite the President’s endless phony claims, “this is no ‘witch hunt,’ ” and Mueller and his investigation will not come up empty-handed.

https://www.newyorker.com/news/letter-from-trumps-washington/the-worst-hour-of-his-entire-life-cohen-manafort-and-the-twin-courtroom-dramas-that-changed-trumps-presidency
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2018 12:21 am    Post subject: Dropping Like Flies Reply with quote

Dropping Like Flies: Another President Trump Ally Cooperates With Investigators
MSNBC
Published on Aug 23, 2018
Former FBI assistant director Frank Figuliuzzi, former U.S. attorney Chuck Rosenberg, AP’s Jill Colvin, and NYT’s Nick Confessore on AMI CEO David Pecker’s cooperation with federal authorities in exchange for immunity, following Michael Cohen’s plea deal

https://youtu.be/hv5bwQcBYwk


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 26, 2018 12:00 am    Post subject: Steele dossier holds up in court Reply with quote

Trump-Russia Dossier Author WINS Libel Case in Court
David Pakman Show
Published on Aug 22, 2018
--A libel lawsuit against Trump-Russia dossier author Christopher Steele is thrown out, further solidifying Steele's own credibility

https://youtu.be/qLcEJMRy2U0


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