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Shakespeare's vocabulary legacy

 
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vu



Joined: 30 Apr 2005
Posts: 2362
Location: L.A., California

PostPosted: Sun Apr 24, 2016 12:44 am    Post subject: Shakespeare's vocabulary legacy Reply with quote

Did you know these come from Shakespeare?

10 Phrases From Shakespeare We Still Use 400 Years After His Death

http://abcnews.go.com/Lifestyle/10-phrases-shakespeare-400-years-death/story?id=38619454

Four centuries after William Shakespeare died in his hometown of
Stratford-upon-Avon, England, his distinctive vernacular still lives on
worldwide.

The beloved playwright wrote at least 37 plays during his lifetime,
including "Hamlet," "Othello," "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and "Romeo and
Juliet," and gave the English lexicon hundreds phrases we still use today.


Here are 10 Shakespearean terms that have withstood the test of time:

"Good Riddance"

Meaning, to happily get rid of anything deemed worthless, this phrase
originated in Shakespeare's 1609 play "Troilus and Cressida." The idiom
was so durable, it even became the name of a popular Green Day song in
1997.

"Break the Ice"

Shakespeare wrote this group of words in his 1590 play "The Taming of the
Shrew." It means to overcome a socially awkward situation.

"Wild Goose Chase"

First seen in 1597's "Romeo and Juliet," a person who goes on a "wild
goose chase" is searching for something that's likely not attainable.

"Love Is Blind"

Shakespeare created this phrase -- often said as a warning -- from his
play "The Merchant of Venice," first performed in 1605. It means that
sometimes one's feelings for their loved ones can obscure reality.

"Brave New World"

This expression from Shakespeare's play "The Tempest," believed to have
been written between 1610-1611, refers to a prominent moment in societal
history.

"Naked Truth"

Shakespeare wrote this phrase in his play "Love's Labour's Lost," written
in the 1590s. It means what you think: the complete and utter truth.

"Green Eyed Monster"

Seen for the first time in 1603's "Othello," this idiom was Shakespeare's
way of describing how jealousy looks.

"Bated Breath"

This is another phrase from "The Merchant of Venice," which means to be so
excited, anxious or nervous that you're actually holding your breath.

"[Fight] Fire With Fire"

Shakespeare wrote this phrase in his 1623 play "King John." It means to
use the same tactics as an opponent to beat them, even if you have to play
dirty.

"Laughing Stock" These two words appear in Shakespeare's play "The Merry
Wives of Windsor," published in 1602. It describes a person or thing that
is greatly ridiculed.
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Bérénice



Joined: 16 Dec 2007
Posts: 395
Location: Across the Ocean

PostPosted: Sun Apr 24, 2016 1:16 am    Post subject: Re: Shakespeare's vocabulary legacy Reply with quote

vu wrote:
Did you know these come from Shakespeare?

No I didn't. I knew some books' titles, lke The Sound and the Fury, or The Winter of our Discontent, among many others, came from Shakespeare, but those everyday phrases, I had no idea.

Funny that the equivalent of "Fight Fire With Fire" in French is "soigner le mal par le mal" (cure evil with evil).
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Dans un mois, dans un an, comment souffrirons-nous
Seigneur, que tant de mers me séparent de vous?
Et que le jour commence, et que le jour finisse
Sans que jamais Titus puisse voir Bérénice?

***
In a month, in a year, how will we steel our hearts
My lord, to being from each other oceans apart?
And that day after day dawns and then dies
Without our ever being able to see each other's eyes?
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Kerowyn
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Joined: 04 Sep 2011
Posts: 1855
Location: Queendom of Valdemar

PostPosted: Sun Apr 24, 2016 1:46 am    Post subject: Shakespeare's vocabulary legacy Reply with quote

I didn't know "Brave New World" came from Shakespeare too! Embarassed

Like Bérénice, I had no idea those common phrases came from the Bard... I do know some quotes... To be or not to be, A rose by any other name, etc. but not phrases as simple and widely used as "Love is blind".
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